The Chief Milkmaid | Barn Raising on the Prairie

Posted in Blogs, Culinary, Feature, Winery

BY VICKY BROWN
August 20, 2014

Saturday evening I had the privilege of attending “The Whale Wins on the Prairie” at Willowood Farm, a fundraising dinner for the Friends of Ebey’s.

Marilyn Sherman Clay volunteered her time and her gorgeous jewel toned goblet and vintage napkins.  Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

Marilyn Sherman Clay volunteered her time and her gorgeous jewel toned goblet and vintage napkins. (photo by Audra Mulkern)

I was excited to go because one of my friends and fellow farmers, Georgie Smith, was hosting the event at the remarkable historic Willowood Farm on Ebey’s Prairie.

The Historic Smith Barn was built in 1880 using mortise and tenon joints. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

The Historic Smith Barn was built in 1880 using mortise and tenon joints. (photo by Audra Mulkern)

I was thrilled to go because the renowned Chef Renee Erickson was orchestrating the cuisine.

Short ribs from 3 Sisters with peaches, grilled to melt-in-your-mouth perfection. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

Short ribs from 3 Sisters with peaches, grilled to melt-in-your-mouth perfection  (photo by Audra Mulkern)

I was anxious to go because many of our Little Brown Farm dairy products would be served to many people who have never tried our goods.

I was nervous to go because I felt I didn’t fit in. I felt I was an outsider, a farmer dining with guests who donated $200 a plate, some driving vehicles worth more than our barn.

When I arrived early I was set at ease; Georgie was still in farm clothes, still doing chores. There were crews bustling about, preparing for the meal service, grilling the food to be served, chilling the wines, setting the stage. Guests would arrive in less than an hour and Georgie, with a delightful smudge of fertile soil on her nose, was still feeding her very old horse.

Georgie Smith on Willowood Farm. Photo credit: Vicky Brown

Georgie Smith on Willowood Farm  (photo by Vicky Brown)

As she went to prepare to welcome the guests, I got to wander the farm with which I’m so blissfully familiar—enjoying the farm dogs and the sweeping vistas.

A group of volunteers from the Coupeville Lions arrived and began traffic and parking coordination. Their friendly faces and joy at being a supporting part of such an event was contagious.

Dave Fish, Hugh Hedges and Jim Colligan represent part of the Coupeville Lions team that volunteered. Photo credit: Vicky Brown

Dave Fish, Hugh Hedges and Jim Colligan represent part of the Coupeville Lions team that volunteered. (photo by Vicky Brown)

From the parking lot we went on a tour of the delightfully marked fields.

Adam Kendrick, Willowood Farm Field Manager explaining the beneficial plant row. Photo credit: Vicky Brown

Adam Kendrick, Willowood Farm Field Manager explain the beneficial plant row. (photo by Vicky Brown)

The tour I was on was led by the passionate and knowledgeable Adam Kendrick, Willowood’s field manager.

Historic Smith homestead. Photo credit: Vicky Brown

Historic Smith homestead  (photo by Vicky Brown)

It ended with a stop in front of the Willowood’s farmstead home. The family home where Georgie grew up and her parents, Renee and Bill Smith live, was built in 1896.

Georgie tells us why we are here. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

Georgie tells us why we are here. (photo by Audra Mulkern)

In front of the rose garden and the white picket fence, Georgie spoke to us. She explained the connection of the Prairie and her family, dating back 5 generations. Listening to Georgie’s words, watching guests hanging on her every syllable, seeing the pride in her parents’ faces I realized this was so much more than a fundraiser, or a fine dinner, or even a community gathering. I was witnessing the Smith family’s very personal and tender love letter to Whidbey Island.

Georgie Smith held our attention. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

Georgie Smith held our attention. (photo by Audra Mulkern)

As Georgie’s voice cracked and she wiped away the uninvited tears, we listened with humility and gratitude. We laughed as she told the stories of a mean old Aunt who MADE people take off their shoes before entering her home (that is what earned her the nickname “mean”). She took us back, inviting us to imagine Ebey’s Prairie any time within the last 120 years, reminding us that except for the power lines and the cell phones a community gathering would have looked much the same.

Historic Smith Barn built in 1880, worth preserving. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

Historic Smith Barn built in 1880, worth preserving (photo by Audra Mulkern)

I missed several of the hors d’oeuvres being served; I was too distracted by the realization that I was at a barn raising. Not the kind that may have raised the Historic Smith Barn in 1880, but the 2014 style. In reality Friends of Ebey’s is more about maintaining the historic buildings and protecting and educating about the Prairie than raising barns. However, it was the same as I imagine the barn-raising families felt when they watched the good work they did go into use and then feasted after the work.

I certainly wasn’t alone feeling the connection of the evening. “Aside from the amazing food,” Sarah Richards of Lavender Wind Farm said, “one of the best parts was sitting with previously unknown people and leaving with new friends.”

New friendships being forged. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

New friendships being forged   (photos by Audra Mulkern)

Every seat was full and the atmosphere was as joyful as I imagine the meal at the end of the barn-raising in 1880. Music filled the barn as Nathaniel Talbot entertained, adding the perfect note to complete the delightful atmosphere.

Nathaniel Talbot kept us entertained. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

Nathaniel Talbot kept us entertained. (photo by Audra Mulkern)

This love letter could not be complete with just Georgie’s poignant speech. It took many other committed people that feel the same way to make it more of a symphony than a letter.

I am so grateful to photographer Audra Mulkern who donated her time, skill and images.

Chef Renee Erickson putting the finishing touches on the squash course. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

Chef Renee Erickson puts the finishing touches on the squash course. (photo by Audra Mulkern)

Chef Renee Erickson, who donated her time, orchestrated the most divine and most local meal I’ve ever had prepared for me.

Chef Jay Guerrero finishing up the short ribs. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

Chef Jay Guerrero finishes up the short ribs. (photo by Audra Mulkern)

Renee’s remarkable team, including the Chef de Cuisine at Boat Street Cafe, Jay Guerrero.

The Coupeville Lions, who successfully kept all the paint on the right cars and the vehicles out of the fields of the produce.

Ebey’s Prairie neighbors who helped Georgie to prepare for this wonderful event with equipment and time.

So many farmers and purveyors including: 3 Sisters, Penn Cove Shellfish, Rosehip Farm, bayleaf, Lavender Wind Farm, Little Brown Farm, Ebb Tide Produce, Mile Post 19 and of course Willowood Farm—that provided the ingredients for the meal and the wine for the delightful pairings.

A delightful group of servers. You may recognize your friends and neighbors. They kept us all entertained, well fed and served delicious food with their whole hearts. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

A delightful group of servers. You may recognize your friends and neighbors. They kept us all entertained, well fed and served delicious food with their whole hearts. (photo by Audra Mulkern)

Finally, to the group responsible for the coordination of so many moving parts to pull this memorable night together—the Friends of Ebey’s.

Friends of Ebey's. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

Friends of Ebey’s   (photo by Audra Mulkern)

If you were unable to attend this dinner, I encourage you to support them however you can. You can donate right from their website or mail in a check. This unique, fertile and exquisite land is worth protecting. The families that are maintaining it are hard-working, dedicated stewards. The community that lives or visits here could not be the same without it. Ebey’s Prairie is truly one of Whidbey’s crowning jewels. I hope you will come, visit and let the symphony of love letters surround you.

Authors note: For those of you who were hoping for a play by play of the incredible meal, I’m sorry. It was simply too good. I tried writing that blog (including some of the pics above and more), but it simply felt mean to show you what you missed. The food, as expected, was divine. I was introduced to agretti – and ooh, I like it!

The menu Renee Erickson put together for the evening. Photo credit: Vicky Brown

The menu Renee Erickson put together for the evening  (photo by Vicky Brown)

Here is the menu… and you can get instructions for preparation of some of the items in Renee Erickson’s new book: “A Boat, a Whale & a Walrus: Menus and Stories.”

Chioggia beet borani, Little Brown Farm goat cheese, dill. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

Chioggia beet borani, Little Brown Farm goat cheese, dill  (photo by Audra Mulkern)

Radishes with green goddess. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

Radishes with green goddess  (photo by Audra Mulkern)

Grilled oysters, snail butter. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

Fresh oysters, snail butter  (photo by Audra Mulkern)

Whidbey Island Winery Rosato. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

Whidbey Island Winery Rosato  (photo by Audra Mulkern)

More bites coming to delighted guests. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

More bites coming to delighted guests  (photo by Audra Mulkern)

Rockwell bean & Penn Cove mussel salad, agretti, dill, summer tomatoes & yogurt. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

Rockwell bean & Penn Cove mussel salad, agretti, dill, summer tomatoes & yogurt  (photo by Audra Mulkern)

Grill toasted bread with Little Brown Farm Ugly Butter finished with Jacobsen salt. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

Grill toasted bread with Little Brown Farm Ugly Butter finished with Jacobsen salt  (photo by Audra Mulkern)

Pork fat potatoes with muscatel vinegar, fennel & dill. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

Pork fat potatoes with muscatel vinegar, fennel & dill (photo by Audra Mulkern)

Grilled & fresh summer squash, toasted garlic, red onion, green coriander vinaigrette, grated Batch 75 (Little Brown Farm aged goat cheese). Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

Grilled & fresh summer squash, toasted garlic, red onion, green coriander vinaigrette, grated Batch 75 (Little Brown Farm aged goat cheese)    (photo by Audra Mulkern)

3 Sisters short ribs with roasted garlic & peach mostarda butter, grilled peaches & mustard greens. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

3 Sisters short ribs with roasted garlic & peach mostarda butter, grilled peaches & mustard greens. (photo by Audra Mulkern)

Sugared fresh rhubarb, blueberries, crème fraiche & cookies. Photo credit: Audra Mulkern

Sugared fresh rhubarb, blueberries, crème fraiche & cookies. (photo by Audra Mulkern)

I hope you will get to enjoy some of Renee Erickson’s fabulous culinary treats at one of her restaurants. Soon you’ll be able to buy her cookbook and recreate some of the flavors at home. So many of the ingredients for this meal were sourced from Whidbey, you can get most of them at Coupeville and Bayview Farmers Markets or even at bayleaf in Coupeville or 3 Sisters shop all week long.

Vicky Brown, Chief Milkmaid at the Little Brown Farm, puts her passions on the page writing about food, agriculture and the tender web of community. 

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Comments

  1. Fabulous write up and pix of a wonderful and worthy event ! So proud of all the Whidbey folks who pulled off this amazing evening !

  2. What a great write up thank you. I so wanted to be there but felt $200 was too much for me & my husband. $100 per head would have been more realistic for us. I recently did a 2 month study of plants on Ebey’s Landing for part of my botanical course for the Society of Botanical Art in London UK. My tutor was entranced with the history and details of the landing. I have become obsessed with the landing and the plants and hope to continue studying there with the different seasons. It would be so nice if at some time an evening of appetizers or a buffet could be served at a lower price for us locals who would love to know more and to raise some money at the same time. Many thanks again. My study pages and final pages can be seen in my photo albums on FB under Deborah Montgomerie.

  3. So sorry you my not have known that we have an annual Reserve Picnic, a fundraiser for $75.00, that was in July, and a free Reserve Potluck coming up at the Crockett Barn on November the 7th. Hope you can come!

  4. Thanks for your feedback and interest in Ebey’s Landing Deb!

    Be sure to stay connected with the Friends of Ebey’s through their website – http://friendsofebeys.org/
    They had a fundraiser at a different price point on July 26 (just a few weeks before this one), and anyone can contribute at any dollar amount at any time through their website – I’m sure $5 would be just as welcome!

    The seats were all full for this one, there were so many faces I would have loved to see there too if there was more room. But the mix turned out just perfect and it served the purpose of both an effective fundraiser and a memorable evening.

    The Friends of Ebey’s are truly aware of the contribution limitations of their supporters and do an excellent job offering wonderful events suitable for all of their friends (including those that can’t offer funds but have skills and time to volunteer). Keep following their passion-filled work! Part of their outreach is education which seems right up your alley.
    Thank you again,
    Vicky

  5. Great job, Vicki. Makes me wish I could have been there, for sure. But now, I’m think I’m going to have to go eat lunch, ahead of time.

  6. I had the great good fortune to attend this spectacular friend & awareness raising event with my husband and sister. We don’t live in the area, but have been visiting Whidbey for over 20 years. We always stay in Coupeville (west side), several times on the Jenne Farm, and have spent quite a bit of time walking, biking, hiking and enjoying Ebey’s Prairie through its farms, bluff, cemetery, etc. It was a stunning evening…the setting, the food & wine, and the abundance of love and commitment replays in my thoughts over and over!

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